Tuesday, June 23, 2009

An Open Letter To The Quintessential Stuy Student...

Dear Slightly Cross-Eyed Camille (aw, too much??):

I don't care that your family is rich (top one percent, my ass, though!). I don't care that you're striving to get a perfect SAT score. I don't even care that you are more obsessive about such a thing than your Bravo-forced "friend" Taylor, who attends my alma mater, Stuyvesant (though Bravo chooses to "protect" the "prestigious institutions" its stars of NYC Prep attend by never explicitly mentioning them, but they don't seem to acknowledge that some of those halls are just as recognizable as the name). Actually, no wait: I do care a little about that last one because just like how Bethenny is not really a housewife, she is not really a prep school student! But I will save that rant for just the voices in my own head. But the thing I do care-- and care a lot, enough to give you, flash in the pan reality star, infamy on this website-- about is that you very excitedly and very openly talk about your "life plan." You have everything so detailed down to the age, and you appear so dedicated and focused that everyone around you can't help but smile and coo over how determined and ambitious you are. And those are great qualities, sure, but what happens when things don't go exactly according to plan?



Now, I know what you're thinking: that can't possibly happen because you have a plan. I know because I was you. I was utterly and uberly convinced I would move out to LA at age eighteen (check), start working on one of my favorite television shows (check), sell a script or a novel (half-check), and then have my pick of project after project, only taking on things I really believed in (so far from that my eyes, ears, teeth, and heart hurt!).

Maybe you're saying that my plan sounds flighty and too dream-like to ever come to fruition, and yours is based in statistics and science and degrees, and therefore will come true. And I hope that's true-- for your sake as well as any tween girl who may watch your story unfold on Bravo and use you as the example that if she makes a plan, she can have a better life, too-- but to me, your plan sounds just as outlandish and far-fetched as mine must seem to you. So though you (or rather, your parents) have wealth and privilege and maybe even a little fame, you are not untouchable, and you can end up as just average. And I'm not saying this out of bitterness or judgment or to try to tear you down or get you to make a Plan B; I just think you should be prepared to fight in a way that such a privileged girl has undeniably never had to fight before.

2 comments:

Jamie said...

This may be jaded, but I'm kind of surprised someone so rich is trying so hard for a perfect SAT score. It seems more sensible for someone who can't rely on money to strive for that b/c she NEEDS that to get the best of the best where as this girl doesn't. We just wrote a whole article at work about how big a part influence plays in getting into law school, even for students who would have been denied by the traditional admissions process. Kids who know they have that influence aren't usually the ones working their asses off to study for that 180.

Though then there's Paris Gellar....

danielletbd said...

That's true, and I guess it's refreshing that she cares about academic things AND the superficial things. These kids just bug me because while in one breath they want the status of being able to say they got such a great score, in the next, they say things like "if I get rejected from a college, it's not the end of it because I can just have a couple of calls made, and they'll revisit me." Ugh. I hate teenagers.